We have all been on The Edge of Seventeen

Movies rarely pull on my heart-strings. Truthfully, I have never been a fan of sappy chick flicks. But last night, I decided to see The Edge of Seventeen with a couple of friends and wow, I was in for a rollercoaster ride of emotions and realizations.

I will not give the entire movie away, but here is a quick synopsis. The movie is about your average seventeen-year-old girl, Nadine, who is trying to make it through high school after being hit with struggle after struggle. Nadine’s best friend (and only friend) begins dating Nadine’s older brother who certainly seems to have it all. Nadine’s mother does not understand Nadine and continuously blames Nadine for being so difficult and hard to read. Nadine ignores the boy who adores her and chases after the boy who will only bring her pain. Nadine’s father is not present in her life, which makes this journey through high school even more troublesome. Ultimately, Nadine reaches a point where she feels completely alone and hates who she is. Her entire world has collapsed and she has no one to confide in or assure her that everything will be okay. She cannot explain why she is lashing out and acting in these ways as she watches her life fall apart with no way to stop it.

Now, the majority of this is in the trailer, so I really did not spoil much for you. I will say this though– the movie had a happy ending, but not one of those predictable, cheesy endings. The Edge of Seventeen is a comedy, which made it so much more enjoyable than those depressing chick flicks. I laughed (a lot) and honestly, my eyes welled with tears as I related to Nadine’s hardships and pain. She tried to keep it in for so long and embrace her uniqueness, but that is so tough to do when everyone is telling you to be someone you’re not. Nadine was not the only one going through difficulties, her brother was too, but he hid it well until he reached his breaking point.

The Edge of Seventeen truly captured what it is like to be a seventeen-year-old journeying through some of the most challenging years of life. High school is a crucial time when everyone wants to conform to avoid standing out in the crowd. Nadine knew she was born to stand out sooner than most teens, which is something I envied about her. Nadine was honest with herself and others, and most importantly, she was real. She embraced her old soul until her entire world fell apart and she was forced to piece it back together. It got me thinking that maybe, it is good to feel like you are at rock bottom as a seventeen-year-old. Maybe, it is crucial to reach that point of a mental breakdown, the point in which you let yourself fall apart, so you can pick up the pieces and start over. The Edge of Seventeen conveyed a truth that is universally ignored, so it resonates in a way different from most movies. Teenagers get hit with a lot of crap (for lack of a better term) and are expected to accept it and move on. In reality, burying the pain deep inside causes more conflict and distress than just expressing it.

The Edge of Seventeen gets it. Teenagers will pretend everything is fine until they hit rock bottom and cannot pretend any longer. Once the smoke has cleared and they can finally get back on their feet, they are not the same person they once were. Through heartbreak and hardships, teens learn from their own personal experiences and can then choose to embrace who they really are. Whether you are an adult or you are seventeen now, you know what it is like to go through the hardest of times and make it out alive. This movie really brought it all together for me. We, seventeen-year-olds, are not alone. Even though we may not show it, we are each going through different things that are unimaginable and unnoticeable to others. So, be kind to everyone and sensitive to their emotions too. It may feel like the end of the world, but how we bounce back and find our true selves in the midst of everything is worth the battle. What matters is moving past the edge and knowing that things can only get better from there.

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KIDS ARE FLOCKING TO POPULAR HOUSEPARTY APP

Meghan Pottle | Staff Writer

Students are just now joining the party – and it has been sitting in their back pockets the whole time.

In 2015, Developer Alexander Herzick launched the application Houseparty, a group video chat that allows up to eight people to chat together in one room, which is a group of people. The app syncs with the user’s contacts and sends them push notifications every time their friends open the app and are in the house.

Users are able to see with whom their friends are chatting and can join their room if they choose. Likewise, if two people are chatting in a room together, any of the users’ friends can join, even if one may not be acquainted with the other person’s friends on the app.

Sophomore Sunny Patel said he uses the app every day.

“When I first got it, everyone was still new to it, so it was just a couple of my friends and we would talk,” Patel said. “Afterwards, I started using it for homework too. For homework, I get on like every night after football because a lot of sophomores get on to do homework together.”

Senior Destyni Dulin said she spends about seven hours on Houseparty on school nights and 12 hours on the weekends.

“You to talk your friends; you see what’s up with them,” Dulin said. “Last night, I made my friend feel really good. She had a breakup, so we were dancing on it and jujuing.”

Freshman Jensen Adleta said she had a strange experience when on Houseparty.

“I didn’t know that you could Facetime someone and Houseparty at the same time, so I answered and I thought it would just go out of Houseparty, but it didn’t,” Adleta said. “They could hear me talking to her, but I can’t hear them, so I can only hear the person on Facetime. When I was talking to my friend, they could hear everything I was saying and then I hung up with the girl on Facetime, and I realized I was still on Houseparty. They were like ‘What the heck were you saying?’”

Because users can see who their friends are chatting with on Houseparty and have the ability to join their room, they may meet new people from MHS.

Dulin said she met several people in the grade below her through Houseparty.

“Before I never talked to them, but now we are pretty good friends,” Dulin said. “My other friend was talking to them, so I just jumped in on their conversation and we started talking. We became friends on Houseparty and now, we are friends in real life.”

Senior Joey Bowlin said he has been able to catch up with friends he has not spoken to in years.

“Since high school started, I haven’t talked to a lot of people,” Bowlin said. “But then, I added them on Houseparty, so we have just talked even though we don’t talk that much (in person) because the school is so big and you don’t see them every day.”

Patel said he became friends with two MHS students he had not spoken to before when they joined his room.

“I met those two from another friend of mine and we were just talking, then they joined in,” Patel said. “That’s what I like about it. You can be open with anyone. Most people are always welcomed in as long as you are not too shy or too awkward. I am an open person, so I get to meet all these people, and they are chill and all fine.”

On Houseparty, there is a feature that allows users to lock the room they are in, so that no one else could join.

Patel said that because users can lock the room, other people on the app could possibly take that as social exclusion.

“Sometimes, me and my friends will be talking about something personal that we don’t tell anyone else,” Patel said. “These are things that happen in high school life. It could possibly have that effect on some people if they don’t realize what we are talking about, so they feel that way.”

Adleta said her boyfriend wants her to delete Houseparty because it takes up too much of her time, and he does not like how users can lock rooms.

“When you lock something, it makes people suspicious,” Adleta said. “It makes people feel like you don’t want them to come in because you’re afraid they are going to hear what you’re talking about. That’s why I don’t lock a room anymore because I didn’t realize that’s how it makes other people feel. Now, I realize I feel the same way when I see my friends in locked rooms and I am like ‘What are they talking about?’”

Dulin said if she could give any advice to people on the fence about getting the app, it would be this.

“If you do not have Houseparty, get it,” Dulin said. “I know some people are like ‘I don’t want to join the trend because I am so cool.’ But, you’re not cool. You’ll be cool once you get Houseparty.”

mpottle.chronicle@gmail.com

Snapchat Addict?

As of today, my longest Snapchat streak is 598 days. That means I have snap chatted the same person for 598 days straight without ever breaking the streak or spending a day away from the application.

But, I have a reason for snap chatting this same person for 598 days straight. Her name is Jacey and she lives in Foxboro, Massachusetts, my hometown. She has been my best friend since I was three years old and still is to this day. We snapchat to keep in touch, to see what each of us are doing that day, and to chat about our lives. Just because we snapchat constantly, does not mean we do not FaceTime, call, and text either. I FaceTime Jacey about once a week and visit her in Foxboro a couple times a year.

Am I addicted to Snapchat? I would not say so. I am not on the app every second of every day, but I do check it every few hours to respond to friends. Actually, as I have gotten older, I am on the app less and less. If one of my friends breaks our Snapchat streak, will I hold a grudge? No, but I know people who will. Breaking a snapchat streak might as well be saying you do not want to be friends with the person anymore to some people. I will say it is crazy how far people will go to keep Snapchat streaks though. When people go on mission trips without phones, they give friends their Snapchat usernames and passwords to keep their streaks for them. With technology constantly growing and evolving, I have no doubt that Snapchat will become more popular as the company updates the app and adds more new features. My only concern is that Snapchat allows teens to be social without really being social. Snapchat certainly does not constitute conversation most of the time and is just an exchange of selfies between individuals. I sometimes wonder if people who hold long Snapchat streaks can hold a real conversation in person. I know I can, but younger generations have it cut out for them when it comes to socializing in the real world.

Snapchat has been around for quite some time and it does not seem to be disappearing any time soon. While I don’t think Snapchat is a real addiction for me, it certainly poses as a threat to those who want to socialize without having to start conversation.